Woman Uses 1950s Turquoise Pyrex Dishes To Transform Her Boring Kitchen

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When she started, Tanya’s kitchen was perfectly serviceable, but that was about all it had going for it.

Also, the oak cabinets were too small and didn’t provide enough storage. They also weighed down the space and made it feel much more cramped than it really was.

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This is the after picture. It’s hard to believe this is the same kitchen!

Tanya removed the upper cabinets and replaced them with open shelving, then gave the remaining, lower cabinets a coat of turquoise paint, inspired by her collection of Pyrex cookware, which you can see displayed on the shelves.

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The walls were freshened up with some drywall and paneling, and everything was painted. They also replaced the counters with some wooden ones and got a new sink and fixtures.

 

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The floor was left unchanged, but the difference is pretty amazing. It looks so much brighter and more open now!

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And changing from the yellower tones of the wood to the cooler turquoise also makes it look lighter and cleaner.

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And the open shelves provide storage without looking too crowded, too.

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The window, free from curtains or shades, lets in lots of light and adds to the open feeling of the room.

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And now, Tanya can show off her Pyrex collection!

The design and color she collects is called butterprint, and served as the color inspiration for the whole room.

As you can see, she’s also collected plenty of other color-coordinated items to give the room personality. Everyday dishes are stowed away on the lower shelves to keep them easily in reach.

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The little landscape paintings over the stove come from Hungary, and the other glasses, plates, and bowls likely all have their own stories, too.

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Tanya even managed to find a turquoise blender!

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Next to the fridge, there’s an open pantry where she can keep her dry goods.

Next to the turquoise, the yellows and beiges of the pasta and grains really pop. We never considered pasta a decorative element before, but it totally works!

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The solid maple countertops were handmade by Tanya’s husband, a crafty person himself. They were built to fit the kitchen, and stained white to match the room.

The wood grain still shows through a bit, though, which makes the counters look a bit more warm and organic.

Tanya isn’t sure about the ultimate fate of her kitchen (she’s contemplating a new floor, among other things), but for now, she loves the new look. In total, this makeover cost $1,492 (CAD, so about $1,135 in U.S. dollars), and it was thanks to hunting around, being thrifty, and DIY-ing!

You can see more of Tanya’s projects on her blog, and you can also keep up with her latest adventures on Instagram and Pinterest.

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